Dr. Hans-Peter Marshall

 

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Dr. Hans-Peter Marshall

 

 

The AGU Cryospheric Focus Group is pleased to announce

Dr. Hans-Peter Marshall (biography)

Has been chosen to receive the 2010 Young Investigator Award

for his significant contribution to Cryospheric Science and Technology.

The Young Investigator Award was presented immediately prior to the Nye Lecture

 

Dr. Hans-Peter Marshall,
Nominated by Dr. Martin Schneebeli (Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL), with supporting letters from Dr. John Bradford, Dr. Kelly Elder, and Dr. Matthew SturmDear AGU Cryosphere Focus Executive Committee,

      I am writing to nominate Dr. Hans-Peter Marshall for the 2010 Cryosphere Young Investigator
Award. Dr. Marshall is currently Assistant Professor at Boise State University. His research
covers in my view an extra ordinate depth and breadth. His contributions are in the area of

– the development of innovative methods to measure and quantify the properties of
snowpacks, especially using radar, but also other modern tools, as micro-penetrometry
and near-infrared photography (publications 11, 13 and 15 in the biographical sketch)

– the development of new algorithms to make the complex data to become useful for
scientific interpretation (publications 9 and 14)

– application of these techniques in hydrology (e.g. in the CLPX10, publication 10), in
biology (Ptarmigan browsing and snowpack, publication 16), in snow avalanche
formation (publications 13, 12).

The development of such techniques is very important to advance science in the cryosphere. In
my view, HP Marshall is a young scientist which pushes new technologies, which is absolutely
necessary to broaden our understanding of the cryosphere on the ground and from space. HP
Marshall makes key contributions in this field, as is visible from his publications and from his
research grants.

     HP Marshall is a very active member of AGU, e.g. he is one of the representatives for the
Cryosphere Section of the AGU Fall meeting.

      We also initiated the “Snow Characterization Workshops”. The first workshop was held in 2008
in Silverton, CO, USA, the second 2009 in Manali, India. These workshops offer the opportunity
to learn modern techniques of snow characterization for young scientists. We plan the next workshop to be held in Boise in March 2011. HP Marshall was instrumental to the idea and
organization.

      These are just two examples for his unselfish help, in addition to his scientific achievements. I

suggest that HP Marshall is very well qualified for the Cryosphere Young Investigator Award.

Dr. Martin Schneebeli

Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL


Selected Publications:

Refereed Publications

K. Tape, N. Rutter, H.-P. Marshall, R. Essery, and M. Sturm (2010). Recording microscale variations in snowpack layering using near-infrared photography. Journal of Glaciology, 56(195):75-80, DOI: 10.1029/2009JF001269.

Marshall, H.P. and J. Johnson (2009). Accurate inversion of high-resolution snow penetrometer signals for microstructural and micromechanical properties. Journal of Geophysical Research – Earth Surface, 114(F04016), DOI: 10.1029/2009JF001269.

Lutz, E., K. Birkeland, and H.P. Marshall (2009). Quantifying changes in weak layer microstructure associated with articial load changes. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 59(2-3):202-209, DOI: 10.1016/j.coldregions.2009.04.003.

Pielmeier, C. and H.P. Marshall (2009). Rutschblock-scale snowpack stability derived from multiple quality- controlled SnowMicroPen measurements. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 59(2-3):178-184, DOI: 10.1016/j.coldregions.2009.06.005.

Hardy, J., R. Davis, Y. Koh, D. Cline, K. Elder, R. Armstrong, H.P. Marshall, T. Painter, G.C. Saint- Martin, R. DeRoo, K. Sarabandi, T. Graf, T. Koike, and K. McDonald (2008). NASA Cold Lands Processes Experiment (CLPX 2002-2003): Local Scale Observation Site. Journal of Hydrometeorology (9), 1434-1442, DOI: 10.1175/2008JHM875.1.

Marshall, H.P., and G. Koh (2008). FMCW radars for snow research. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 52 (2), 118-131, DOI:10.1016/j.coldregions.2007.04.008.

Waddington, E.D., T.A. Neumann, M.R. Koutnik, H.P. Marshall, and D.L. Morse (2007). Inference of accumulation-rate patterns from deep radar layers in glaciers and ice sheets. Journal of Glaciology, 53 (183), 694-712.

Marshall, H.P., M. Schneebeli, and G. Koh, 2007. Snow stratigraphy measurements with high-frequency radar: comparison with snow micro-penetrometer. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 47, 108-117.

O’Neel, S., H.P. Marshall, D.E. McNamara, and W.T. Pfeffer, 2007. Seismic detection and analysis of icequakes at Columbia Glacier, Alaska. J. Geophys. Res., 112, F03S23, doi:10.1029/2006JF000595.

Marshall, H.P., G. Koh, and R. Forster, 2005. Estimating alpine snowpack properties using FMCW radar, Annals of Glaciology, 40, 157-162.

Recent Conference Papers

International Snow Science Workshop 2008, Whistler, B.C., Canada, Sept. 21-26:

Marshall, H.P., K. Birkeland, K. Elder, and T. Meiners (2008). Helicopter-based microwave radar measurements in alpine terrain. Proc. of the 2008 Int. Snow Science Workshop.

Marshall, H.P., C. Landry, S. Hale, J. Roberts, and H. Conway (2008). Snow slope stability modeling of direct-action avalanches in a continental climate: Red Mountain Pass, CO. Proc. of the 2008 Int. Snow Science Workshop.

Pielmeier, C. and H.P. Marshall (2008). Estimating Rutschblock stability from SnowMicroPen measurements. Proc. of the 2008 Int. Snow Science Workshop.

Gleason, J.A., H.P. Marshall, and J. McCreight (2008). Into the belly of the beast (snow depth across starting zones measured with frequency modulated continuous wave radar). Proc. of the 2008 Int. Snow Science Workshop.

Lutz, E., K. Birkeland, H.P. Marshall, and K. Hansen (2008). Quantifying changes in weak layer microstructure associated with loading events. Proc. of the 2008 Int. Snow Science Workshop.

XXIXth International Union of Radio Science (URSI) General Assembly, Chicago, IL, August 9-16, 2008.

Marshall, H.P., G. Koh, and M. Sturm (2008). Ultra-broadband portable microwave FMCW radars for measuring snow depth, snow water equivalent, and stratigraphy: practical considerations. Session F05, Remote Sensing of the Cryosphere Proc. of the 2008 URSI GA (INVITED).

MtnClim 2008, Consortium for Integrated Research in Western Mountains (CIRMOUNT), Silverton, CO, June 9-12, 2008

Marshall, H.P., J.A. Gleason, J. McCreight, and C. Landry (2008). From a point to a basin: comparing continuous, point snow depth measurements from an automatic weather station with extensive, high resolution basin-wide depths in Senator Beck Basin, CO.

64th Eastern Snow Conference, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, May 29-June 1, 2007:

Marshall, H., N. Rutter, and G. Koh (2007). Ground-based FMCW radar measurements of dry snowpacks during the 2006-07 NASA CLPX field experiment. Proc. of the 2007 Eastern Snow Conf.

Demuth, M.N., H.P. Marshall, E.M. Morris, D.O. Burgess, C. Bell (2007). High-resolution near-surface snow stratigraphy inferred from ground-based broadband microwave radar measurements: Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada 2005-06, CryoSat/ASIRAS validation campaign. Proc. of the 2007 Eastern Snow Conf.

Link to Past Young Investigator Award Recipients


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